Responses of Plant to UV-B Radiation (Advances in Vegetation Science)



Publisher: Springer

Written in English
Cover of: Responses of Plant to UV-B Radiation (Advances in Vegetation Science) |
Published: Pages: 296 Downloads: 79
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Subjects:

  • Plant ecology,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Life Sciences - Ecology,
  • Atmospheric Radiations,
  • Plant Physiology,
  • Science,
  • Plants, Effect of ultraviolet radiation on,
  • Agriculture - Crop Science,
  • Life Sciences - Botany,
  • Nature / Plants,
  • Earth Sciences - Meteorology & Climatology,
  • Effect of ultraviolet radiation on,
  • Plants,
  • Plants, Effect of ultraviolet

Edition Notes

ContributionsJelte Rozema (Editor), Yiannis Manetas (Editor), Lars Olof Björn (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages296
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7809069M
ISBN 100792360621
ISBN 109780792360629

Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, – nm) is an important environmental signal that regulates growth and development in plants. Two dose-dependent UV-B response pathways were described in plants: a specific one, mediated by UVR8 (the specific UV-B receptor) and an unspecific one, activated by the oxidative damage produced by radiation. The constitutively expressed receptor appears inactive Cited by: 1.   The impact of elevated UV-B radiation on plant species is well understood, but knowledge of the effects of UV-B on insect pests and disease-causing pathogens (fungi and bacteria) is limited. Research conducted thus far has shown both a decrease and an increase in disease and pest damage in response to increased UV-B radiation. While UV-B radiation can be damaging, it also has a more positive role in plant photomorphogenesis. Consequently UV-B treatments are being developed as innovative approaches to improve horticulture. This book is a timely synthesis of what we know and need to know about UV-B radiation and plants. (source: Nielsen Book Data). UV-B Radiation and Amphibian Declines 23 March Andrew R. Blaustein, Professor of Zoology, Oregon State University There are three types of ultraviolet radiation: UV-A (nm), UV-B ( nm) and UV-C ( nm) (Blaustein et al. ).

UV-B ( to nm) and UV-C ( to nm) radi-ation. Whereas UV-C is entirely absorbed by the strato-spheric ozone layer, UV-A and some UV-B radiation reach the Earth’s surface and thus can affect the bio-sphere. UV-B is the most harmful form of radiation from sunlight reaching the Earth mainly because it can cause photochemical DNA by: @article{osti_, title = {Morphological responses of crop and weed species of different growth forms to ultraviolet-B radiation}, author = {Barnes, P.W. and Flint, S.D. and Caldwell, M.M.}, abstractNote = {Recent evidence of a general, global decline of stratospheric ozone has heightened concern about possible ecological consequences of increases in solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B, nm. Enhanced UV-B radiation decreased plant height, dry weight, total biomass, seed germination, seed size, and yield per plant (Liu et al). Growth reduction is mediated through leaf expansion, which is a consequence of the UV-B radiation effects on the rate and duration of both cell division and elongation (Hopkins et al.,).Author: B. R. Gadi.   In the literature, plant UV-B responses are defined by low dose radiation (below or at ambient level, lower than 1 μmol m-2 s-1) or high dose radiation (above ambient level, 1–3 μmol m-2 s-1 or above) and short term (usually from seconds to hours) or long-term (usually from hours to days; Brown and Jenkins, ; Lang-Mladek et al., Cited by:

The Solar Radiation Spectrum UV-B radiation refers to a specific portion of the sun’s energy reaching the earth’s surface. To understand how this is defined, we need to understand the general nature of solar energy. The energy of the sun reaching the earth is known as electromagnetic radiation. If we were to observe the sun above the earth’sFile Size: 1MB.

Responses of Plant to UV-B Radiation (Advances in Vegetation Science) Download PDF EPUB FB2

UV-B radiation is perceived by a photoreceptor, triggers morphological responses and primes plant defense mechanisms such as antioxidant levels, photo-repair or accumulation of UV-B screening.

Responses of Plants to UV-B Radiation (Advances in Vegetation Science Book 18) - Kindle edition by Rozema, Jelte, Manetas, Yiannis, Björn, Lars Olof. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Responses of Plants to UV-B Radiation (Advances in Vegetation Science Book 18).Manufacturer: Springer.

Responses of Plants to UV-B Radiation by Jelte Rozema,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The responses of plants and ecosystems from the Antarctic and Arctic to enhanced solar UV-B radiation as a consequence of the hole in the ozone layer are considered in some detail.

In addition the papers in the book discuss the problem of how responses of plants to UV-B radiation interact with other environmental factors. Thus, any UV‐B effect on plant morphology needs to be assessed in the context of an array of environmental influences.

The Biological Function of UV‐Induced Morphogenesis. Several UV‐B‐induced plant responses (e.g. UV‐B‐induced accumulation of Cited by: While UV-B radiation can be damaging, it also has a more positive role in plant photomorphogenesis.

Consequently UV-B treatments are being developed as innovative approaches to improve horticulture. This book is a timely synthesis of what we know and need to know about UV-B radiation and plants.

UV-B radiation causes a multitude of responses that are summarized as low- and high-fluence responses similar to phytochrome responses (Kim et al., ). Because five different phytochromes and several blue/UV-A-light receptors are present in Arabidopsis that confer light intensity-dependent responses, the question arises whether one.

"This book constitutes an excellent review of current knowledge in the area of the changing UV-B environment and plant responses. This is an excellent source of information and further references on the subject of plants and UV-B." Dawn Gordon, CBA/ABC BulletinFormat: Hardcover.

Consequently, a larger proportion of the UV-B spec-trum reaches the Earth’s surface with serious impli-cations for all living organisms (Xiong and Day, ; Caldwell et al., ).

Elevated UV-B radiation (UV-B) has pleiotropic ef-fects on plant development, morphology, and phys-iology, summarized in Table I.

The morphologicalCited by: The direct effects of UV-B radiation ( nm) on plant litter decomposing at four European field sites; S.A. Moody, et al. Terrestrial Plants and Terrestrial Ecosystems.

Enhanced UV-B affects biomass production in a dune grassland ecosystem; A.M.C. Oudejans, et al. UV-B Radiation: From Environmental Stressor to Regulator of Plant Growth presents a comprehensive overview of the origins, current state, and future horizons of scientific research on ultraviolet-B radiation and its perception in plants.

Chapters explore all facets of UV-B research, including the basics of how UV-B's shorter wavelength. Whereas UV-C is entirely absorbed by the stratospheric ozone layer, UV-A and some UV-B radiation reach the Earth’s surface and thus can affect the biosphere.

UV-B is the most harmful form of radiation from sunlight reaching the Earth mainly because it can cause photochemical DNA by: The influence of ambient solar UV-A or UV-B radiation on growth responses was investigated in three varieties of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) after exclusion of solar UV-A/B radiation: JK, IH.

Photomorphogenic Responses to UV-B Radiation. It has been known for many years that UV-B exposure modifies plant growth and biochemical content (Klein ).

Building on previous observations, research in the ’s characterised several photomorphogenic responses to UV-B light that could not be explained by the action of known photoreceptors. The need for information concerning the relationship between plants and UV-B is therefore pressing.

This volume brings together authoritative contributions from leading experts in UV-B/plant studies and is unique in considering interactions at various scales, ranging from the level of the cell through to the level of the community.

Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) has profound effects on plant growth and development, and exposure varies with ozone depletion and across geographic regions, with ecosystem and agricultural consequences.

This book deals with large-scale impacts but also how UV-B affects plants at the molecular level is also fascinating, and the UV-B photoreceptor has only recently been characterised.

The UV-B specific photoreceptor, UV resistance locus 8 (UVR8), initiates UV-B-mediated signaling pathways in response to low levels of UV-B radiation.

Under UV-B radiation, UVR8 is translocated from cytosol to nucleus and interacts with COP1 (CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), resulting in an increase in the expression of HY5 (ENLONGATED Author: Haijie Dou, Genhua Niu.

UV-B Radiation: From Environmental Stressor to Regulator of Plant Growth presents a comprehensive overview of the origins, current state, and future horizons of scientific research on ultraviolet-B radiation and its perception in plants. Chapters explore all facets of UV-B research, including the basics of how UV-B's shorter wavelength Author: Vijay Pratap Singh.

Responses of Plants to UV-B Radiation (Advances in Vegetation Science Book 18) eBook: Rozema, Jelte, Manetas, Yiannis, Björn, Lars Olof: : Kindle StoreManufacturer: Springer.

Topics include: UV-B and its climatology UV-B and terrestrial ecosystems Plant responses to UV-B stress UB- B avoidance mechanisms UV-B and production of secondary metabolites Discovery of UVR8 Timely and important, UV-B Radiation: From Environmental Stressor to Regulator of Plant Growth is an invaluable resource for environmentalists.

The new book “UV-B Radiation and Plant Life: Molecular Biology to Ecology” edited by Brian Jordan is about to be published by CABI with contributions by several UV4Plants members. Source: UV-B Radiation and Plant Life: Molecular Biology to Ecology at CABI’s website. The publisher’s blurb: Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) has profound effects on plant growth and development, and exposure.

Hofmann RW, Campbell BD, Bloor SJ et al () Responses to UV-B radiation in Trifolium repens L.—physiological links to plant productivity and water availability. Plant Cell Environ – CrossRef Google ScholarAuthor: Suruchi Singh, S.

Agrawal, Madhoolika Agrawal. ery ). The UV-B radiation is projected to further increase in the future. It is hypothesized that current and projected increases in UV-B radiation can alter cotton growth and development.

An understand-ing of the effects of solar UV-B radiation on cotton would provide information about the causes of changes in growth, development, and. Plants' responses to Ultra Violet-B radiation Author: Dhammaprakash P.

Wankhede ICAR-National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Pusa campus, New Delhi Ultra-violet B (UV-B, – nm) radiation is a small component of minor component of the solar spectrum and is strongly absorbed by ozone in stratosphere. We report that the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant sensitive to ABA and drought2 (sad2), which harbors a T-DNA insertion in an importin β-like gene, is more tolerant to UV-B radiation than the wild type.

Analysis of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer accumulation revealed that less DNA damage occurred in sad2 than in the wild type during UV-B treatment. The effects of UV‐B radiation on leaf model used (Suchar and Robberecht ) does not include the photomorphogenic responses to UV‐B radiation, which may regulate the gene activity responsible for secondary metabolites production and photorepair of DNA lesions, and may inhibit leaf cell expansion.

If these photomorphogenic effects are Cited by: 7. UV-B radiation can, thus, exert mechanistically distinct effects on plants depending on the UV-B dose ().High UV-B doses can cause oxidative stress, and under these conditions generic stress-induced flowering may also be anticipated (Wada and Takeno, ).Conversely, under low UV-B doses distress will be absent and UV-B-mediated flowering will be part of a specific, regulated by: Many different plant responses to supplemental UV-B radia- tion have been observed (Tevini and Teramura, ).

The best studies have increased UV-B levels to simulate conditions that would exist with a defined reduction in the ozone layer (typi- cally 10 to 20%). As a control, the same lamps are shielded with a plastic film that absorbs all UV Cited by: Plant responses to UV-B. How do plants survive the potentially harmful effects of UV-B in sunlight.

Most people enjoy sunshine and sunlight has beneficial effects, including the s. Preface; Part I. The Ozone Layer and UV-B Radiation: 1. Ozone depletion in the Northern Hemisphere J. Pyle; 2. Monitoring changes in UV-B radiation A.

Webb; 3. Action spectra for UV-B effects on plants: monochromatic and polychromatic approaches for analysing plant responses G. Holmes; Part II. Effects of UV-B on Plants at the Cellular Level: Range: £ - £. • UV-B and production of secondary metabolites • Discovery of UVR8.

Timely and important, UV-B Radiation: From Environmental Stressor to Regulator of Plant Growth is an invaluable resource for environmentalists, researchers and students, into the state-of-the-art research being done on exposure to UV-B radiation.The development of stratospheric ozone might have been in proportion to the gradual atmospheric oxygen increase.

In any case, stratospheric ozone, which absorbs solar UV-C completely and much of the UV-B radiation, re­duced the flux of damaging solar UV on the earth’s surface and must have allowed the evolution of plant life. Stress effects occur mainly at high doses of UV-B in non-acclimated plants, while low levels of UV-B can induce true photomorphogenic effects acclimating the plant without any signs of stress (Jenkins, ; Jansen and Bornman, ).

As hormones are ubiquitous in the regulation of plant architecture and metabolism, it comes as no surprise Cited by: